Just a few short months ago, I was reading an article titled “Why Would an Engineer-Turned-Mom Care so Deeply About Apologetics?” As soon as I saw the words “Mom” and “Apologetics” in the title, I knew I had to find out more about this Cathryn Buse lady. I immediately bought her book on kindle, and as I was reading it thought “Oh my gosh… It’s my mind-twin.” Cathryn’s book is laid out so systematically and logically, it could only have been written by an engineer. Having science-nerdishenss in common, I contacted her about her work, and the rest we can say is history!

Rebekah, Cathryn and I got to spend a whole weekend together recently at an apologetics conference I (Hillary) was speaking at. It was only fitting to record a podcast together, introducing the world to our newest Mama Bear! In this episode, we introduce you to the woman behind Teaching Others to Defend Christianity. We discuss the importance of apologetics for moms, and we give a recap on the apologetics conference that we attended. So come join Rebekah and me as we welcome Cathryn Buse to Mama Bear Apologetics!

People and resources mentioned:

Cathryn Buse – Teaching Others to Defend Christianity
Defending the Faith
Sean McDowell’s blogpost – Why Would an Engineer-Turned-Mom Care So Deeply about Apologetics?
Danielle Camorlinga – Picture Book Apologetics
Melissa Cain Travis – Young Defenders
William Lane Craig – What Is God Like?

Quotable quotes:

“The whole idea of apologetics is not necessarily to present different facts and evidences and argue different points. It’s to eventually get [people] to see the truth of Jesus Christ and the resurrection. The first step before you can explain repentance and forgiveness and reconciliation – you have to know that there is something you are repenting to, that you’re reconciling with. And so to me, the first step is, “How do we know that God exists?” But, of course, that doesn’t get you to Jesus Christ, because that too can be deism. Christianity is the only religion that offers that solution to our sin issue.” – Cathryn Buse

“It was not just an academic exercise for me. I was in the trenches with my faith fully being tested. I became a Christian at a young age and grew up in a very strong, Biblical, doctrine-teaching church. But when I got into that scientific degree program, going through engineering with my bachelor’s and my master’s, then I started getting those questions. … I needed to understand, but not just for my own faith. . . How do I then articulate [this faith] to my friends that question it? To my classmates and my work colleagues?” – Cathryn Buse

“It was driven out of necessity, and then desire for merging my intellectual side with my love of the faith so those two passions could come together and fully coexist. You can’t always trust your heart. We’re told to continually test things, because you have to verify what you have in your heart and what you’re feeling about something. Is that Scriptural? Is that from the Holy Spirit and not the spirit of this world? That does require engaging your thought process.” – Cathryn Buse

“We don’t even necessarily have to have the answer for everything. Even if we don’t explain it perfectly, what our kids need is to have a history of, “When I have questions, there are answers available.” . . .  then in the future, even if [they]  encounter a question that [they] don’t have the answer to, [they] can say, “From past experience, these tough questions usually have even tougher answers. So, even if I can’t get this one figured out, I’m going to trust [that there are answers], because that’s what my past experience has taught me.” However, if their past experience has just been, “Have more faith,” and that is their only experience, then what do they do when they reach those tough questions in college? They’re going to say, “These ones probably don’t have answers either, so why should I even look for them?” or “These other people over here, they seem to have the answers. So maybe I’m going to start listening to them, because they’ll actually talk to me about this stuff.’” – Hillary Morgan Ferrer

 

The tough questions can feel scary when you're alone...
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